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The Heat Transition and the Heat Pump

By using heat pumps, we can not only reduce our ecological footprint but also become more independent from fossil fuels in the long term.

In times of climate change and the urgent need to reduce our CO2 emissions, the heat transition is increasingly coming into focus. In particular, the heat pump is at the center as a technology that enables the transition to renewable energies and thus the elimination of fossil resources.

The heat pump harnesses natural energy from the environment to heat or cool buildings, delivering significantly more efficient results than conventional heating systems. By using heat pumps, we can not only reduce our ecological footprint but also become more independent from fossil fuels in the long term.

The heat transition is thus not only an ecological concern but also an economic and political field. The transition to heat pumps requires investments in infrastructure and technology and challenges existing business models. However, this is precisely where the opportunity lies to develop innovative solutions and overcome dependence on finite resources.

How does a heat pump work?

The heat pump operates with a refrigerant, a liquid that vaporizes at very low temperatures. To generate heat for heating, the liquid refrigerant absorbs energy from the environment. Due to the environmental heat, the liquid refrigerant vaporizes into refrigerant vapor in the evaporator. A compressor compresses the refrigerant vapor, making it very hot. The hot refrigerant vapor then releases its heat to the heating circuit, cooling down and becoming liquid again. The pressure drops via the expansion valve, cooling the refrigerant and returning it to its initial temperature. Then the cycle begins again.

Advantages of a heat pump

  • To provide heating and hot water, the heat pump requires energy. The majority of the energy comes from the environment, with only a quarter being produced by electricity.
  • The energy from the environment is free and unlimited.
  • Heating costs thus remain stable.
  • Due to low electricity consumption, rising electricity prices are less relevant.
  • By additionally utilizing a PV system, self-produced and freely generated electricity can be used to operate the heat pump.
  • The heat pump itself does not produce CO2.

It is time to consider the heat transition and the heat pump as a central component of our path to a sustainable future. The elimination of fossil resources is not only an ecological necessity but also an opportunity for innovation and progress. Let us together shape this transformation and ensure sustainable heat supply for future generations.

Further articles

The Heat Transition and the Heat Pump

By using heat pumps, we can not only reduce our ecological footprint but also become more independent from fossil fuels in the long term.

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Kristina Klehr